elo™ Pillow as Kid-Centric Example of the Internet of Things

elo™ Pillow as Kid-Centric Example of the Internet of Things
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The “Internet of Things” refers to the modern inclination to “improve” products to be more automated, more advanced, smarter, and linked together in various massive networks whether online, through social media, or just throughout one’s home.

When we begin using things such as wearable tech, automated thermostats, or sensors on everything, the question becomes: Is it helpful or ultimately a detriment that the actions of individuals, however small, are being replaced by technology? What happens when we “close the loop,” or take the human out of the equation?

This article from Logic PD Insights focuses on elo™ Pillow, examining how the bedtime process is improved by elo, providing positive reinforcement when kids stay lying down, and goes on to ask if it is good or bad that the parent isn’t the one hammering home that message in that moment. As part of the ongoing discussion for the Internet of Things, the positives and long-term goals are weighed against the negatives.

Parents are definitely not out of the bedtime equation, thankfully, and are the major players in teaching behaviors, habits, and preparing kids for sleep.

In the case of elo, as any parent will tell you, having another tool and another voice reminding your child to lie back down and rest can be a huge help at bedtime. Parents are definitely not out of the bedtime equation, thankfully, and are the major players in teaching behaviors, habits, and preparing kids for sleep.

The key to answering this “closing the loop” question when speaking about elo is to look at when elo comes into play in the child’s day. Is it actually replacing what the parents would be sitting there doing? Or is it preemptively helping the parent avoid having to walk a child back into the room? Is it letting the child learn to fall asleep without Mommy rubbing his or her back for 30 minutes, for example? elo assists parents and kids at a moment when the parents have completed the bedtime routine, and probably shouldn’t (and don’t want to be) playing sentinel in the child’s bedroom in case the child gets up.

Using a tech tool that “has your back” when you’re not in the room, and reminds kids to stay in bed, is a partnership many are finding to be a game-changer.

What do you think? For more ideas on this subject, our Dreams Team of doctors and sleep experts weighed in on technology for kids in our blog post “Technology in Kids’ Hands (or Under Their Heads): Good, Bad, or Something In Between?” We’ve also addressed the parent’s role at bedtime in more detail in: “Does elo Replace Parent Storytime?”

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